Graduate Citings: DURAPS Edition with Kirsten Fahlbusch

Hello Grad Students!
All this week and next week we’ll be featuring research that will be featured at the DU Research and Performance Summit (DURAPS), which is only 2 weeks away! Today we’d like to bring you the eye-opening research of GSPP master’s student Kirsten Fahlbusch. Kirsten’s prior experience as a deputy probation officer motivated her to tackle the tricky issues surrounding gender in law enforcement. She specifically looked into whether a probation officer’s and/or victim’s gender had an influence on a probationer’s compliance. We hope you’ll enjoy learning more about her research both in this blog and at the summit!

Researcher: I am a second year master’s student enrolled in the Forensic Psychology program which is in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology department.

DURAPS Presentation: Title- Probation Compliance and Gender

I conducted research on the interaction between the gender of probation officers, probationers, and the victims of the probationers’ offenses, I then explored how these various gender combinations impacted the probationers’ compliance. Some of my questions included: “were male probationers more compliant when assigned to female probation officers compared to male probationers assigned to male officers?” and “were probationers with female victims more compliant when assigned to female probation officers compared to those assigned to male officers?” My sample came from a Domestic Violence and Sex Offender unit, so all of the probationers’ offenses had identifiable victims. The results of my study found that the gender of the probation officer has an effect on the probationers’ compliance, and that the gender of the probation officer and the probationers’ victim makes a difference regarding the probationer’s compliance. Specifically, probationers were more compliant when assigned to female probation officers.

I was a deputy probation officer on the Domestic Violence and Sex Offender Unit for my field placement during the first year of my program, and I was interested in the demographic makeup of both the clients and the officers working on the unit. Probation is historically a male-dominated field, but the unit I worked on was predominately staffed by female officers so I wondered whether gender played a significant part in any of the work. I was especially interested in how probationers who had offended on female victims would interact with female versus male officers, since probationers would have to interact with a female in an authoritative role rather than as their victim.

Collaborators: This was an independent research project, but I received help throughout the process from Dr. Neil Gowensmith and Dr. Laura Meyer.

Research Advice: Going through the IRB process and getting the project off the ground was probably the most frustrating aspect of conducting my study, and the process took longer than I expected. So, my research advice to other DU graduate students would be don’t let the IRB process get you down or discourage you from working to get a project approved.

I hope to see you all at DURAPS on Friday April 7th, 2017 where I’ll be presenting my research!

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