Ask a Vet: Army Vet Discusses What Brought Him to DU

Josef Korbel master’s student and Army vet, Chris Mamaux, has some advice for his fellow DU veterans: No excuses. Crush it. He will be sharing more about what drives him and what it was like transitioning from active military to graduate school at DUSVA’s Ask A Veteran Anything event today from 12-1. Here’s a little snippet of his he’s learned over the years and what motivated him to explore the first-hand effects of non-functioning states across the Middle East/South Asia:

How long were you on active duty? I served 5 years of active duty for the U.S. Army, working in the Parachute and Stryker Infantry units.

Where did you serve? I served in a variety of different locales including:

  • Georgia– I received my initial and advanced Infantry training, as well as Airborne School, commonly known as Jump School in the Peach State.
  • North Carolina– Next I moved to North Carolina where I served in a line Company within the 82nd Airborne Division’s 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment.
  • Texas– Then my travels took me to Texas where I served in a line Troop within the 3d Cavalry Regiment’s Sabre Squadron.
  • Afghanistan– Finally, I was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), to Logar Province, Afghanistan. Here I conducted a variety of missions including partner operations with an Afghan National Army brigade and securing and escorting the ballots for the RC (regional command) East in the 2014 election. Missions ranged from the mundane to the unique during our time there, and culminated into a massive effort in the fall of 2014. During this time we worked to strategically degrade the ability of the Taliban to continue to stage attacks in and around Kabul by surging into a district in the south of Logar which had not seen US/Coalition forces since 2011.

What was the hardest part about transitioning to civilian life? Everything moves at an incredibly fast pace in the military, even when you are playing the “hurry up and wait game.” Leaving that environment and getting back into the “real world” can feel like being dropped from warp speed. The pitfall to avoid in that instance is letting yourself get too comfortable with the slower pace and losing sight of what you need to do in order to achieve your personal and professional goals.

What are you studying at DU? I am pursuing my interest in the nexus of development and security in Josef Korbel’s International Security master’s program. I am specifically interested in seeing the first-hand effects of non-functioning states across the Middle East/South Asia, and trying to understand how security provides the atmosphere for development. I suspect that, after certain thresholds have been met, this will in turn require less security down the road. My scholarship is not for a thesis, nor a substantial research paper per se, but it drives how I structure my courses as well as topics I choose for required papers/projects.

Do you have any recommendations for other veterans transitioning from active duty to university life? Any higher level academic setting is going to be a challenge, not just for you, for everyone. We’re all in the same boat, and yes, there will be times when elevated stress will be the norm – for a short while. The tasks you face will be different, but not harder than what you’ve accomplished in the military. This is your time to succeed in a different arena you also volunteered to enter. No excuses. Crush it.

*Don’t miss DUSVA’s Ask A Veteran Anything event this today from 12-1! Ten DU student veterans will be sharing their diverse experiences while serving our country and transition to civilian life.

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