Ask a Vet: Army Vet Discusses What Brought Him to DU

Josef Korbel master’s student and Army vet, Chris Mamaux, has some advice for his fellow DU veterans: No excuses. Crush it. He will be sharing more about what drives him and what it was like transitioning from active military to graduate school at DUSVA’s Ask A Veteran Anything event today from 12-1. Here’s a little snippet of his he’s learned over the years and what motivated him to explore the first-hand effects of non-functioning states across the Middle East/South Asia:

How long were you on active duty? I served 5 years of active duty for the U.S. Army, working in the Parachute and Stryker Infantry units.

Where did you serve? I served in a variety of different locales including:

  • Georgia– I received my initial and advanced Infantry training, as well as Airborne School, commonly known as Jump School in the Peach State.
  • North Carolina– Next I moved to North Carolina where I served in a line Company within the 82nd Airborne Division’s 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment.
  • Texas– Then my travels took me to Texas where I served in a line Troop within the 3d Cavalry Regiment’s Sabre Squadron.
  • Afghanistan– Finally, I was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), to Logar Province, Afghanistan. Here I conducted a variety of missions including partner operations with an Afghan National Army brigade and securing and escorting the ballots for the RC (regional command) East in the 2014 election. Missions ranged from the mundane to the unique during our time there, and culminated into a massive effort in the fall of 2014. During this time we worked to strategically degrade the ability of the Taliban to continue to stage attacks in and around Kabul by surging into a district in the south of Logar which had not seen US/Coalition forces since 2011.

What was the hardest part about transitioning to civilian life? Everything moves at an incredibly fast pace in the military, even when you are playing the “hurry up and wait game.” Leaving that environment and getting back into the “real world” can feel like being dropped from warp speed. The pitfall to avoid in that instance is letting yourself get too comfortable with the slower pace and losing sight of what you need to do in order to achieve your personal and professional goals.

What are you studying at DU? I am pursuing my interest in the nexus of development and security in Josef Korbel’s International Security master’s program. I am specifically interested in seeing the first-hand effects of non-functioning states across the Middle East/South Asia, and trying to understand how security provides the atmosphere for development. I suspect that, after certain thresholds have been met, this will in turn require less security down the road. My scholarship is not for a thesis, nor a substantial research paper per se, but it drives how I structure my courses as well as topics I choose for required papers/projects.

Do you have any recommendations for other veterans transitioning from active duty to university life? Any higher level academic setting is going to be a challenge, not just for you, for everyone. We’re all in the same boat, and yes, there will be times when elevated stress will be the norm – for a short while. The tasks you face will be different, but not harder than what you’ve accomplished in the military. This is your time to succeed in a different arena you also volunteered to enter. No excuses. Crush it.

*Don’t miss DUSVA’s Ask A Veteran Anything event this today from 12-1! Ten DU student veterans will be sharing their diverse experiences while serving our country and transition to civilian life.

Ask a Vet: Marine Corps Veteran and DU Student Shares His Journey

Happy Monday Pios! We are very excited to highlight the military and university experiences of master’s student Conner Swett. Conner is a first year master’s student in the International Security program at the Korbel School of International Studies. His research focus is on international development and security. He’ll be presenting on the Ask A Veteran Anything panel tomorrow at 12, but we wanted to get things started a little early and give you a sneak peak!

How long were you on active duty? I served in the Marine Corps for 9 years and 3 months, reaching the rank of Staff Sergeant.

Where did you serve? I was lucky to have served on 5 major continents including a position in the U.S. at the Pentagon! Here’s a breakdown of my travels:

  • Okinawa, Japan 2008 – 2009
  • Marine Corps Embassy Security Guard
    • Pretoria South Africa 2010 – 2011
    • Asuncion, Paraguay 2011 – 2012
    • Moscow, Russia 2012-2013
  • Office of the Staff Judge Advocate to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters Marine Corps, The Pentagon 2013 – 2016

What was the hardest part about transitioning to civilian life? I would say dropping everything and moving across to the country to attend graduate school was one of the hardest parts. I came to DU with a lot of unknowns. Once I was accepted I immediately put my stuff in storage, packed my car up, and attempted to drive from Washington to DC to Denver. Unfortunately, my car broke down on the way and I ended up taking a train and just barely made the first day of school this past winter quarter!

Another difficult aspect of transitioning to university life was not having the support staff that I had gotten so used to. I had become so comfortable with having offices for events in the area, financial/education, admin to help me with my pay, and a legal office to provide me free legal services. Oh and the lack of insurance and figuring that out. That was something I never had to think of before. (I am still pumped that I get gym access!)

What brought you to DU? I lived in South Africa for a year and fell in love with the area. Over the years, I have read more about the continent to stay aware of the political events, history, cultures of the individual countries. Those aspects instilled me with the desire to focus on international development that region. Korbel’s program International Security seemed like a perfect fit for that. Right now I’m taking my first development class this quarter and those I have met in the class have been amazing and have kept my interest in development going strong.

Do you have any recommendations for other veterans transitioning from active duty to university life?

  1. Reach out to the SVA. The SVA staff and members have gone through the same stuff you have and will have some advice. It also gives you a place to socialize with other veterans and you can discuss (or vent) on your transition and student life.
  2. Get involved with a club or group. Leaving the military can seem lonely and you can feel like there’s a lack of direction. You were a Marine, a soldier, or a sailor, that was who were and it can be a shock that that’s not you anymore. I was warned about it, but it wasn’t until a few months later that it hit me. Joining a club or group or getting involved in the community of the school is a great way to find that new role and mission to help out.
  3. Meet new people but don’t jump in with talking about the military. Sounds strange but it’s comparable to going to college and talking all about high school or going to a new unit and only talking about your past unit. It’s hard for other people to relate and build a connection with you and that’s what university life is about, meeting new people and expanding your perceptions. I found that I had a lot in common with people once I stopped talking solely about my Marine Corps life all the time, which really helped me adjust to my new life. Let’s be clear, I’m not ashamed or hiding that I’m Marine, I just don’t go waving it around.

*Curious to learn more? Don’t miss DUSVA’s Ask A Veteran Anything event this Tuesday! (Also, there will be free lunch from Garbanzo Mediterranean Grill!)

Ask a Vet: US Army Vet Reflects on His Transition to University Life at DU

So much goes into the transition from active duty to civilian life for a veteran, especially when it comes to integration into a university. This Tuesday, 10 student veterans will be sharing their diverse experiences while serving our country and transition to civilian life at DUSVA’s Ask a Veteran Anything event. We hope you’ll be able to join DU faculty, staff, students and alums as they ask DU veteran students about their varied perspectives. Today we’re excited to highlight one of those student veterans, Dan Rouse. Dan Rouse is a graduate student enrolled in Daniels College of Business’ Executive MBA Program (EMBA).

How long were you on active duty? My total service in the U.S. Army comprised 27 years. I served 23 years as an officer, and 4 years as an enlisted soldier.

Dan in Tibet

Where did you serve? I guess all over is too broad, but I did cover some serious distance whilst serving in 5 of the 10 Army divisions. After Ranger School, I started out in Hawaii with the 25th Infantry Division. Next was the 101st Airborne in Kentucky. Following that I went back to Hawaii and did three years of POW/MIA investigations and recoveries. Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) kicked off and I did a year there. Then I went to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, for a year at the Command and Staff College, before stationing at Fort Bliss, Texas, with the 1st Cavalry Division/1st Armored Division and followed by15 months in Iraq. Finally, I went back to Hawaii for 3 years of POW/MIA missions and then retired from the 82nd Airborne, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Overall I’ve worked in the United States, Australia, New Guinea, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, China, Tibet, North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Kuwait, Iraq, and the United Arab Emirates!

What was the hardest part about transitioning to civilian life? Actually, two things come to mind. The first, and most significant, was the loss of purpose. No matter “the suck,” when you’re in the military, you always had a sense of duty to a higher cause, whether it was to your comrades, your unit, or the basic oath to “Defend the Constitution against all enemies foreign or domestic.” You were a part of a distinct culture with its own values and norms. So the cultural dislocation was huge. You live your life as a member of it, but end as an employee moving on. It’s hard to get that same feeling from turning a profit, etc.

The second, for me anyway, was finding my next career. I did my time and could have had all the “security” t-shirts I wanted, but I had no desire to be a government contractor/beltway bandit or get a government job. When you put those restrictions on future choices, the prospects dim a little. As one recruiter candidly put it, “I’m looking for round pegs for round holes and you’re an oval.” I was either overqualified (meaning they didn’t think I’d stick around very long) or didn’t have the right background experience. Bluntly, too many civilian recruiters and HR folks considered me too expensive. HR computerized applicant tracking systems didn’t really digest military resumes very well – even when they’re “civilianized” by resume reviewers. These two components, along with many others, were what motivated me to pursue the EMBA program in Daniels; civilian credentials and networking as “mercenary” as it sounds.

Do you have any recommendations for other veterans transitioning from active duty to university life? Treat your education as you treated your service; you can’t just show up. You need to maintain the work ethic and discipline you had when you were in service and transition it to your studies. Build connections with your professors, alumni, peers, etc.; they may be the key connection to your next career. For undergraduates: you have life experience advantages that almost none of your peers do, so use them. “S2” your situation (most service members will know what “S2” is) and get the most out of your university experience (which doesn’t end at attending class or getting good grades).

*Curious to learn more? Don’t miss DUSVA’s Ask A Veteran Anything event this Tuesday!